Avoiding Pedestrian Accidents

Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 in Pedestrian Accidents | 0 comments

Avoiding Pedestrian Accidents

It can be argued that the drivers should be the ones making the effort to avoid hitting pedestrians. It can also be argued that the pedestrians should be the ones making the effort to avoid getting hit by vehicles. But it shouldn’t be an argument, because both parties should make the effort of avoiding collisions.

Pedestrian accidents do not just result into injuries and medical bills. According to the website of Habush Habush & Rottier S.C. ®, those who have been hurt in pedestrian accidents may take legal action, especially if the accidents have been caused by recklessness or negligence.

Safety Tips for Drivers

Drivers are the ones responsible for operating big chunks of metal that can hit people, so it is just right that they make the effort of trying to avoid collisions. This can be successfully done by considering the following safety tips:

  • Always drive in a speed where you can fully control your vehicle and react on time in case something unexpected happens, like when a pedestrian suddenly crosses the street
  • Always give way to crossing pedestrians, even though you have the right-of-way, because giving in is always better than causing an accident
  • Be particularly alert on parking lots, school zones, residential areas, and other places where pedestrians are extremely vulnerable
  • Be wary of cars parked at the edge of the roads, as there may be pedestrians behind them that may suddenly cross the street
  • Make it a habit to use signal lights before turning, especially in intersections, so crossing pedestrians will know what you are about to do and try to avoid you

Safety Tips for Pedestrians

  • Always follow right-of-way, because you are at the disadvantage when an accident occurs
  • Always look left, right, and left again before crossing, even though the road is a one-way street
  • Avoid crossing the street near obstructions, such as parked cars
  • Cross only on spots with the proper cross markings
  • Stay in the sidewalk, and if there is no sidewalk, walk in the opposite direction of traffic flow, so you can see the possible dangers
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$5 million: The Maximum Compensation Possible for Injured NFL Players

Posted by on Feb 21, 2017 in NFL Injury | 0 comments

Sporting events always comes with risk of injury. Risk of injury, however, is always highest in the sports football, this being a high-impact sport. To many athletes, sports commentators and legal professionals,football and injuries go hand-in-hand. Due to all the tackling, blocking and other physical interactions between players, game recaps would always include casualties and injuries, like contusions, musculoskeletal injuries and concussions.

Most of the injuries sustained by football players are musculoskeletal injuries, without doubt. However, there are two others are more much more serious than these simply because they affect the brain: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Concussion.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that can lead to memory loss, dementia and depression. Concussion, meanwhile, is “a change in a player’s mental state due to a traumatic impact. Not all those who suffer concussion lose consciousness; others rather suffer headaches, dizziness, nausea, drowsiness, numbness/tingling, loss of balance, difficulty concentrating, and blurry vision.

The law firm Ali Mokaram, in its website, talks about the head injuries suffered by Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman during the 1993 NFC Championship Game. He received a knee to the head that eventually landed him in the hospital that same evening. In 1994, it was Chicago Bears’ fullback Merrill Hodge who suffered a blow to the head. The injury did not only leave him unable to recognize his close family members, including his wife; it also made him retired from football completely.

The firm also says, “In the opinion of an increasing number of scientists, NFL players are paying the cost of such entertainment with their health and long-term well-being. Once their playing careers have ended, many NFL players find that the physical toll that playing professional football has taken on their bodies makes them unable to live a productive, healthy life. Some of these injuries include physical pain from broken bones and joint injuries, but increasing evidence shows that many professional athletes also have suffered degenerative brain disease from repeated concussions as a result of playing in the league.”

Though the NFL denied for so long any possible link between the sport and brain injuries or CTE, it reversed course in 2014 and settled a lawsuit filed by former NFL players amounting to more than $765 million. These players attribute their neurological problems to their time in the league.

Football is and will remain to be a dangerous and violent game. It involves very strong and heavy players running into each other at full speed. The sad thing is, the more violent it is, the more fans, owners and camera crew get awestruck since they do not fully understand how these violent collisions can result to chronic brain damage and/or irrecoverable body impairment.

Repeated concussions due to this event can lead to:

  • Reduced life span
  • High medical costs
  • Brain damage
  • Chronic headaches
  • Impaired concentration and memory
  • Reduced balance

Those filing NFL concussion lawsuits, may be able to avail of the settlement fund the NFL has approved and reserved for injured players. However, applying for compensation may lead to better results if done through and with the help of a seasoned lawyer, who may be able to help an injured player receive the maximum compensation possible, which is $5 million.

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Avoiding Motorcycle Accidents

Posted by on Dec 29, 2016 in Car Accidents | 0 comments

Motorcyclists are one of the most vulnerable motorists on the road. Unlike car drivers, motorcyclists are not enwrapped in a metal casing that can absorb the force of collision. They are more likely to receive a substantial amount of the force, get ejected, and get injured or killed.

For that reason alone, motorcyclists should be very diligent on the road, as a single mistake can lead to an accident that put not just them at risk, but also the others that will be directly or indirectly involved. Below are common motorcycle scenarios that can cause collisions and how you can avoid them.

Colliding with vehicles that are turning or changing lanes

You are diligently riding on the road when a car suddenly makes a left turn into an intersection in front of you. Most of the time, this is the car driver’s fault, because of his failure to consider blind spots and the speeds of the vehicles in his left side. According to the website of Schuler, Halvorson, Weisser, Zoeller and Overbeck, P.A., motorcycle accidents that have occurred because of a negligent party may be subject to personal injury lawsuits.

But whoever is at fault, the damage has been done. The motorcyclist has crashed into the side of the car and has ended up injured.

The same thing happens with car drivers who change lanes without consideration to the others around them. The maneuvers can cause motorcyclists to get hit, lose control, and crash.

The best way to avoid this is by being mindful of the vehicles around you and their speeds. Remember that you are more vulnerable than car drivers. So even if they are the ones who make the mistake, there is a possibility that you will sustain the more serious damage.

Negotiating curves

A common cause of motorcycle crashes is the failure to negotiate bends and curves in the road. Motorcyclists can be complacent because of the steering capabilities of their motorcycles, but sometimes this complacency can lead to misjudging the shape and sharpness of curves. It even becomes worse if the motorcyclist is going at a high rate of speed.
Failure to negotiate curves may force motorcyclists to hit the brakes, which can eject and injure them. It may also lead to motorcycles veering off roads, crashing into obstructions like trees, or going down embankments.

The key to avoid such accidents is to know your surroundings and not going above safe speeds, so you can react safely on unexpected circumstances.

Dealing with road hazards and other obstructions

You just successfully negotiated a curve, only to find out that there is a big rock directly into the path of your motorcycle wheels and you have no time to react. Such obstructions on the road, like patches of sand, animal dung, and other foreign objects, can put unnecessary strain in your front tire, causing you to slip and crash.

You should also watch out for potholes, dangling tree branches, and other obstacles that may also make you lose control of your motorcycle.

The best way to avoid this is by not traveling too fast, so you can react swiftly to unexpected hazards or avoid them outright.

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Employees Susceptible to Developing RSI

Posted by on Jul 4, 2016 in Personal Injury, Workplace Injury | 0 comments

As offices began replacing their typewriters with computers during the 1980s, it did not take very long before a number of employees started feeling crippling pain and weakness in their hand, wrist and elbow, due to repetitive keyboard work. This feeling of pain and weakness required many to wear an arm splint, while missing work at the same time; others, however, who suffered worse conditions, necessitated surgery. This injury, which is due to repetition of the same motions for hours everyday, is called repetitive stress injury (RSI).

RSI was first reported in the U.S. in 1912, being called “telegraphists’ cramp” back then. As the name suggests, the injury was suffered by telegraph operators who developed the mysterious ailment due to doing repetitive taps on telegraph keys. During World War I, the injury was given the name, “glass arm,” which affected Morse Code operators. Many other types of workers were later diagnosed with repetitive motion injuries including, assembly line workers, construction workers, meat packers, seamstresses and manufacturing workers. From the 1980s and onwards, though, when computers started becoming regular equipment in offices, the bulk of reported repetitive stress injuries shifted to computer operators.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, RSI, also called repetitive motion injury (RMI), cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) or musculoskeletal disorder (MSDs), is now one of the most common workplace injuries. Its new victims, besides computer operators, include grocery bar code scanners/checkers, phone operators, who usually support a telephone receiver between his/her neck and shoulder, and workers in static posturing for long periods, like airline mechanics, who crawl and have to work while in a twisted position.

Repetitive motion injury attorneys, like those from the law firm Scudder & Hedrick, PLLC, encourages those who suspect that they may have developed a repetitive motion injury to seek medical attention immediately as failure to do so can worsen their condition. It is also advisable that they file a Workers’ Compensation claim that could allow them the freedom to adequately recover from their injury.

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Bicycle Accidents

Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 in Bicycle Accidents, Injury | 0 comments

A car-bicycle accident in St. Augustine, Florida that occurred on Wednesday, February 17 resulted in one teenager getting hurt. The victim was identified as 17-year-old Shawn McCook.

McCook said that fortunately, he didn’t suffer from major injuries in the accident and “didn’t break or fracture anything luckily, but [his] foot is still swollen” and that he is finding it difficult to perform some motor functions.

According to Florida’s Integrated Report Exchange System, five people had been killed in bicycle accidents in 2015.

Attorneys at Schuler, Halvorson, Weisser, Zoeller, & Overbeck, P.A. say that nowadays, if you are a bicyclist, following the laws like putting on a helmet while you ride your bicycle or keeping strictly to bike lanes when you are traversing national highways will not be enough to spare you the hurts of getting involved in an accident, especially since you are sharing the road with other motorists who might not be as law-abiding as you.

For instance, the law tells bicyclists to ride as far right as they can; however, this will not help your visibility to other motorists who are pulling out of driveways when someone exiting a parked car opened their door right in front of you, or motorists coming from behind you followed you too closely because you did not afford them the opportunity to change lanes.

The most common way for a bicyclist by a vehicle is when the vehicle is pulling out of a side street, a driveway on the right, or a parking lot, either when the bicyclist is in front of the vehicle and the vehicle hits him, or the vehicle is directly in front of the bicyclist and the bicyclist is forced into a situation wherein he has no choice but to slam into the vehicle directly ahead of him.

Lone way for other vehicles to notice you while you’re riding a bicycle is for you to ride with lights on – on your helmet, your bike parts, or even your clothing (via neon-colored clothes). When you ride at night, it is essential that you get a front headlight for your bicycle. Even during the day, a blinking white light can help make you more visible to motorists who otherwise might have made the mistake of right crossing you.

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